50 Quotes About Writing Headlines That Attract The Most Readers – by Caples, Hopkins, Collier, etc.

50 Quotes About Writing Headlines That Attract The Most Readers – by Caples, Hopkins, Collier, etc.

What is the “Unpardonable Sin” in blogging? What one thing renders all your hard work over your article useless?

POOR HEADLINE.

Your headline matters a lot. You may spend hours or days polishing your article. “When it reaches the Hall of Judgement where the reader sits and decides its fate, it may find itself cast into the hell of wastebasket-dom,” says Robert Collier, a genius copywriter from the past.

If your headline does not resonate with the reader, he moves on, and you are left with another lost sale.

That is why I list here 50 quotes (tips) about writing headlines. All proven tips to help you write headlines that attract the most readers. All quotes by exceptional copywriters, such as these: John Caples, Claude Hopkins, Robert Collier, etc.


1. Every single element in an advertisement – headline, subhead, photo, and copy – must be put there not because it looks good, not because it sounds good, but because testing has shown that it works best! – John Caples


2. If you use a poor headline, it does not matter how hard you labor over your copy because your copy will not be read. – John Caples


3. Don’t think that those millions will read your ads to find out if your product interests. They will decide at a glance – by your headline or your pictures. Address the people you seek, and them only. – Claude Hopkins


4. If the headline is a good one, it is a relatively simple matter to write the copy. – John Caples


5. Headlines that are merely a statement of fact are not effective in getting people to read copy.

  • NOTHING ROLLS LIKE A BALL

Readers know what the copy is going to say. – John Caples


6. Make an offer they can’t refuse. – John Caples


7. The purpose of the headlines must be to convey a message to people who read headlines, then decide whether or not they will look at the copy. – John Caples


8. If you are going to emphasize certain words in the headline, be sure that they are the words that say something. – John Caples


9. Promise your most important benefit in the headline or first paragraph. – Benjamin Suarez


10. Write your copy to show what the product does for the reader. Write “benefit” copy which shows the most important benefit to the reader in the headline or first paragraph – Benjamin Suarez


11. Avoid the “hard-to-grasp” headline – the headline that requires thought and is not clear at first glance. – John Caples


12. In striving to produce an attractive headline, the copywriter should not emphasize the “quick, easy way” to such an extent that the headline becomes unbelievable. – John Caples


13. Remember that the headline and the appeals are ONE AND THE SAME. In successful ads, the appeal is almost always expressed in the headline. – John Caples


14. Even today you can look through almost any consumer or professional publication and find headlines that possess not a single one of the necessary qualities, such as self-interest, news, or curiosity. – John Caples


15. People are hurried. The average person worth cultivating has too much to read… They are not going to read your business talk unless you make it worth their while and let the headline show it. – Claude Hopkins


16.

  • MEN MAY NOT ADMIT IT, BUT…
  • CHILDREN SHRIEK WITH JOY
  • LOOK AT THE SEA!

What hopeless, useless, senseless headlines! They sat nothing, mean nothing, sell nothing. – John Caples


17. A good headline can make an advertisement good even if the picture is poor. – John Caples


18. Learn exactly WHAT SORT of headline is most appealing. Test alternative headlines.
Claude Hopkins


19. Feature a FREE OFFER:

  • FREE 10-DAY TRIAL OF THREE-RECORD ALBUM
  • FREE TRIAL LESSON

– John Caples


20. The best headlines are those that appeal to the reader’s self-interest, that is, headlines based on reader benefits. They offer readers something they want – and get from you. – John Caples


21. The writer has before him keyed returns on nearly two thousand headlines used on a single product. The story in these ads is nearly identical. But the returns vary enormously, due to the headlines. – Claude Hopkins


22. Every copywriter knows what it is to struggle with a copy for hours, for days – fixing it, polishing it, rearranging it. We have all been quilty of leaving the headline until the last and the spending half and hour on it – or perhaps only ten minutes. – John Caples


23. David Ogilvy tells of writing 104 headlines trying and trying them out on his associates before he came up with the classic:

  • AT 60 MILES AN HOUR, THE LOUDEST NOISE IN THE NEW ROLLS-ROYCE COMES FROM THE ELECTRIC CLOCK.”

– John Caples


24. Begin your headline with the word “How”:

  • HOW DO I CONNECT MY BUSINESS TO…?
  • HOW I STARTED A NEW LIFE WITH $7

– John Caples


25. The identical ad run with various headlines differs tremendously in its returns. It is not uncommon for a change in headlines to multiply returns from five or ten times over. – Claude Hopkins


26. The writer of this chapter spends far more time on headlines than on writing. He often spends hours on a single headline. Often scores of headlines are discarded before the right one is selected. – Claude Hopkins


27. You can write a 1st paragraph that continues the same thought you expressed in your headline. If you stop a reader with a headline about house paint, you can be sure of at least one thing about that reader: He wants more info about house paint. You will not lose him as long as you continue to give him what he wants. – John Caples


28. Remember that the reader’s attention is yours for only a single instant. They will not use up their valuable time trying to figure out what you mean. – John Caples


29. Get the big point of your advertisement into your headline. Use your headline as a hook to reach out and catch the special group of people you are trying to interest. – John Caples


30. Feature the PRICE in your headline

  • KILLER $500 CD PLAYER

– John Caples


31. An advertisement will be a good one – that is if the headline is really a “stopper.” – John Caples


32. Avoid the “too smart” headline. Instead of making the readers want to buy, it simply makes them exclaim, “How clever!

  • WOMEN! READ THIS SUMMERY SUMMARY, …

– John Caples


33. Do not try to make your headline so short that it fails to express your idea properly. It’s more important to say what you want to say – even if it takes 20 words to do than make it short and fail to express your idea. – John Caples


34. Every successful advertisement in the test had a certain strong, specific appeal expressed in the headline.
Unsuccessful headlines were not written without a strong appeal, but it was the wrong appeal for that product and that audience. – John Caples


35. The identical ad run with various headlines differs tremendously in its returns. It is not uncommon for a change in headlines to multiply returns from five or ten times over. – Claude Hopkins


36. For every curiosity headline that succeed in getting results, a dozen will fail. – John Caples


37. The advertiser’s logotype at the bottom of the ad can be considered as part of the headline. After reading the headline, the reader instinctively looks down at the logotype to see the company name. – John Caples


38. A long headline that really says something is more effective than a brief heading that says nothing. – John Caples


39. The business of judging a headline AFTER you read the copy is wrong. It takes for granted that everybody reads the copy. – John Caples


40. What good is all the painstaking work on copy if the headline isn’t right? If the headline doesn’t stop people, the copy might as well be written in Greek. – John Caples


41. They want economy, beauty, labor savings, good things to eat and wear. There may be products which interest them more than anything else in the magazine. But they will never know it unless the headline or picture tells them. – Claude Hopkins


42. The headlines are critically important. The majority of the public reads little else when deciding whether or not they are interested. – John Caples


43. I believe that all copywriters ought to put on it the best headline they can and then say to themselves, “How can that headline be changed to be more interesting or appeal to more people?” – Don Belding


44. The success of an entire advertising campaign may stand or fall on what is said in the headlines of the individual advertisements. – John Caples


45. Every single element in an advertisement – headline, subhead, photo, and copy – must be put there not because it looks good, not because it sounds good, but because testing has shown that it works best! – John Caples


46. The success of an entire advertising campaign may stand or fall on what is said in the headlines of the individual advertisements. – John Caples


47. Avoid meaningless headline:

  • A PLAIN FACT FOR PLAIN PEOPLE
  • WHEN, AS AND IF…

– John Caples


48. Now I spend hours on headlines – days if necessary. And when I get a good headline, I know that my task is nearly finished. – John Caples


49. Every business man receives a large number of circular letters. Most of them go directly to the waste basket. But he acts on others, and others are filed for reference. Analyze those letters. The ones you act on or the ones you keep have a headline which attracted your interest. – Claude Hopkins


50. The headline of an advertisement accounts for 60% of the pull of that ad. In the same way, the start of a letter makes or breaks the letter, because if the start does not interest your reader, he never gets down to the rest of your letter. – Robert Collier

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